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setting up "areas"

Thread began 3/22/2010 10:34 pm by edrosenthal350859 | Last modified 4/02/2010 1:11 pm by edrosenthal350859 | 889 views | 7 replies |

edrosenthal350859

setting up "areas"

I was able to install and run the admin without a hitch, and have created a test pages and see more or less how it works. Then i took a real page to have a second go around with the admin function to insert text, named the "page" with the real page name, got the developer code into that page and uploaded it and voila...

After doing an insert text from admin area i get the developer code and put that in the page i want to use, then upload the file (after converting it to php from html) and the inserted text will show up, as the record i just created with the admin function pushed a record from the database to that part of the php file i just uploaded.

So if i have multiple areas of a page i will have to use multiple developer codes on that page for each part of the page, or is there another way?
so if i have a client change the part of a h1 tag then the code would be placed
inside the h1 tag.

and so on for the paragraph following.. that is <p> ...developer code...</p>
would preserve the styling for these tags.

For files that have already a lot of content, i would have to go thru and get several developer codes for all these areas of the page, interspersing the dev. code. in between all the tags. Is there a better way?
Also is there a way to just leave the developer code in place but without any text? Can you think of a reason why i might want to do this?
thanks!

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neilo

Hi Ed,

The degree to which you break down your page into seperate editable areas is entirely up to you, based on the logic of the page dynamics - i.e. there may be areas that will require regular updating, and it would make sense for each of those areas to have its own inserted developer's code, as the styles that exist for those areas in your page's stylesheet will be inherited by the editable areas in the CMS. There may also be areas of the page design that will not need to be updated.

It may also be easier for your clients to administer the updating process without 'breaking' your design if you use more rather than fewer specific areas.

Having said that, this test page has only three editable areas, two of them in the side bar, and the third being the entire main content area, which I would be happy with if it were me doing the editing. If it were a client doing the editing, I would want to break it down in to individual areas to ensure that the internal design structure of the content area remained intact!

Incidentally, the way I did that was to copy all of the content area html code and save it to Notepad, then delete it from the page html and replaced it with the developers code for the editable 'content' area. I then went to the CMS Admin update pages for that page's content area, selected 'Source View' and pasted in the original html code out of the Notepad doc.

If you paste the code between h1 tags, then all text will be in h1 format unless that is changed from within the CMS. You could leave it like this if it was a Section Title that was going to be regularly updated. Generally though, I think it would be best to place the code in areas with normal page text properties, and add any special formatting as required from within the CMS. You can also set up the HTML Editor to add your own page styles to its 'Style' toolbar select list.

You can create your areas with the developer code in place without any text or content if that makes sense - and it often could - but in practice I've found I have to enter a couple of spaces in the CMS' WYSIWYG area otherwise the new area won't save.

Not sure if this cleared anything up, but the bottom line is that you can set up things exactly as you want them, based on how you foresee the practicality of the page updating and your clients' abilities.

Please post back with any queries as and when required!

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edrosenthal350859

seo considerations

that response is exactly what makes sense, and is precisely where i was heading. more areas is going to get you less headaches when clients have to choose discrete areas to modify. My concern now turns to SEO, where what they write will have an impact on search. Do you have suggestions as to how to create the best seo scenario, when the content is being pulled out of the 'black box database'?
I can see that the <h1> tag area is very important, and probably won't change or have client modify that area. but who knows how the page will be impacted by their deletions and additions... i certainly won't be giving them access to the meta tags!
thanks in advance,
-e

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neilo

Hi there Ed,

SEO is a huge subject - loads of different pet theories from loads of different experts. I've seen articles saying that the importance of h1 tag is overrated, but most seem to agree that it is one of the main criteria in getting yourself seen. The people here say, "Significance of h1 tags has multiplied in recent years. Google’s search engine crawler gives more importance to h1 tags than keyword and description meta tags."

The general concensus seems to be to make every word count not just in the meta tags but in all the main hot-spots, i.e. between the page <title> tags, the heading tags, and the menu stucture item descriptions. Most 'Home' pages carry a first-paragraph mission-statement type introduction to the site's business, which generally remains the same, so the home page is important. Each page should deliver what it's meta tags promises. As to what your clients might put into the content areas, there's not much you can do to influence that.

A well defined and relevent (current) html site-map along with regularly submitted site-map xml is important - there are many solutions for this, - have a look at WebAssist's Surveyor. It all adds up.

It's good that you're thinking about it now, though - it is often an afterthought for a designer.

I probably know less about this that most, so it would worth puting in the time doing a round of the forums asking for tips, just to get an idea of the current concensus and memes.

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cathy271120

setting up "areas"

Just educate your clients on use of heading tags found in the WYSIWYG editor...and tell them that to maintain the websites styling throughout (that you have it programming into the sites global styling)--to not assign any color or typefaces to the headings...unless they wish to.

All of my clients understand this--and if they are truly found of a certain color for the headings, have them contact you and you can change it in the headings globally so they will not have to assign different colors to the tags as they edit/update.

Having so many ssi in a page is typically not the most optimum way of doing things--break it to sections that they will require regular updating to.

Be sure that when you insert new content, you maintain page name for all areas of one page.
i.e. Page name: front page, content area: introduction are, Page name: front page, content area: contact information

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edrosenthal350859

seo considerations

i guess the drift of my question was lost in all your expertise of an answer.
The question i really wanted to ask was
1) do the bots see the text that is in the database, or does it see the developer notes code?
the bot is crawling without a browsers intelligence is it not?
2) if it does see the text that is fine, then i should be able to use that piece of information in the sitemap.xml ( frequency of change).
3) if it does not see the text but only sees the developer notes, well that is something i should be aware of, and try to deal with that the best i can.

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Ray BorduinWebAssist

The bot will see the text that is in the database that is added to the page from powerCMS as if it were part of the html.

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edrosenthal350859

awesome

that is awesome news. thanks for that answer!

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